Organic Herbs & Spices

Our organic herbs and spices are hand-selected from the finest harvests each year. Our herbs are trusted for their unmatched quality and freshness. All of our herbs and spices are cut and sifted and packaged in bulk bags unless otherwise noted.

Broccoli Sprouting Seed

Brassica oleracea

COMMON NAME

Standardized: broccoli
Other: heading broccoli, sprouting broccoli

BOTANICAL NAME

Brassica oleraceae L. var. italicaa                                                               
Plant Family: Brassicaceae

OVERVIEW

Broccoli seed is the source of broccoli sprouts, the most potent natural source of sulforaphane glucosinolate, a natural compound found in broccoli and other cruciferous plants that supports the body's antioxidant functions. Broccoli sprouts are added to salads, soups, pestos, pizzas, and wraps for flavor and texture. Try them as an addition to Greek salads, sun-dried tomato dishes, guacamole, tortilla soup (added just before serving), tofu, carrots, or as a side dish all on their own with a little vinaigrette.

PARTS USED

The raw seeds

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Added to food, as noted above, and soaked for sprouting.

 

Buckthorn Bark

Frangula alnus

COMMON NAME

Standardized: frangula
Other: alder buckthorn, buckthorn

BOTANICAL NAME

Frangula alnus Mill.
Plant Family: Rhamnaceae

SYNONYMS

Rhamnus frangula

OVERVIEW

The buckthorn is a shrub native to Europe, Western Asia, and the Middle East. Buckthorn is never used fresh. It is collected in the summer, and then must be aged for at least a year to break down its anthrone chemicals. If the buckthorn is not aged, it is not laxative, it is purgative, causing intense intestinal spasms and vomiting. The herb can be artificially aged by heating or aeration, but some useful constituents may be lost.

PARTS USED

Properly aged bark. (1 year recommended)

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Best taken as a tablet, can be used as a tea but is hard to drink given its bitter taste. May also be prepared as an extract.

 

Cardamom Pods

Elettaria cardamomum

COMMON NAME

Standardized: cardamom
Other: Mysore cardamom, ela

BOTANICAL NAME

Elettaria cardamomum (L.) Maton var. cardamomum
Plant Family: Zingiberaceae

SYNONYMS

Amomum cardamomumElettaria cardamomum var. minisculaElettaria cardamomum var. minus

OVERVIEW

The sweetly aromatic cardamom is the fruit of a tropical plant related to ginger, and is one of the world's most expensive spices, after saffron and vanilla. Growing cardamom is extremely labor intensive. The tall plants, grown on plantations in Guatemala or India, flower for eight or nine months of the year. Each pod, or capsule, ripens slowly, and must be plucked when it is three-quarters ripe.

PARTS USED

The seed, removed from the pod, and ground.

Whole pods may be used as well.

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Usually in cooking, but also in teas, tinctures, and infusions.

Chive Rings

Allium schoenoprasum

COMMON NAME

Standardized: chive
Other: chives

BOTANICAL NAME

Allium schoenoprasum L.
Plant Family: Liliaceae

OVERVIEW

The chive is the smallest of the onion family and is native to Asia and Europe, and has been used both medicinally and as a culinary ingredient for 5000 years, but not actively cultivated until the middle ages.

PARTS USED

The fresh or dried stem, chopped.

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Can be used to make teas, but more often used in cooking.

     

Coriander Seed

Coriandrum sativum

COMMON NAME

Standardized: coriander (fruit), cilantro (leaf)
Other: Chinese parsley, yuan sui zi

BOTANICAL NAME

Coriandrum sativum L.
Plant Family: Apiaceae

OVERVIEW

Coriander is a spice that has been used in the Mediterranean and Asia for thousands of years and is now widely cultivated and available in the West. Traditionally, it was used to support healthy digestion and was often added to beans or other hard to digest dishes due to its carminative qualities. Further, it is well known as a flavoring for liquor, beers, and various soups, sauces, and meats.

USES AND PREPARATIONS

Dried, ripe spherical fruit (seed) whole or powdered as a spice, tea, or flavoring for liquor.
Fresh ripe fruit distilled into an essential oil

Epimedium (Horny Goat Weed) Leaf

COMMON NAME

Standardized: epimedium
Other: barrenwort, horny goat weed

BOTANICAL NAME

Epimedium grandiflorum C. Morren
Plant Family: Berberidaceae

SYNONYMS

Epimedium macranthum

OVERVIEW

Epimedium is an ivy-like ground shrub of the higher and drier areas of China and Tibet. It is in the same plant family as Barberry and Oregon Grape, and its first recorded use is circa 200 B.C.E. in China. The name of the herb in Mandarin, yin yang huo, roughly corresponds to “weed for licentious goat.” Legend has it that a goat herder discovered the properties of epimedium by observing his billy goats’ uncontrollable sexual appetites after they grazed on the herb.

PARTS USED

The dried leaf.

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Teas, tinctures, encapsulations of the leaf or powder.

Guarana Seed

Paullinia cupana

COMMON NAME

Standardized: guarana

BOTANICAL NAME

Paullinia cupana Kunth
Plant Family: Sapindaceae

PARTS USED

Seed

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Brewed as a tea, in food and snack items, added to coffee, as a capsule, and in extract form.

Hydrangea Root

Hydrangea arborescens

COMMON NAME

Standardized: hydrangea
Other: seven barks, wild hydrangea

BOTANICAL NAME

Hydrangea arborescens L.
Plant Family: Hydrangeaceae

OVERVIEW

The hydrangea has shown up in the fossil record as far back as 70 million years ago in North America, and in Asia as far back as 25 million years ago. This stately flower is native to the southeastern United States and northeastern Asia. It grows near water, hence its name. The name is derived from the Greek, meaning water vase. They were brought to England in the 1730’s where the popularity as an ornamental grew quite rapidly. The grayish roots have little odor but a sweet and pungent taste. . English folklore calls it an unlucky plant for young ladies looking for a husband. It has been said that people who allow the plant to grow near their house have cursed their daughters to the life of a spinster.

PARTS USED

Dried rhizome and roots.

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Traditionally used as a tea or in sugar syrup. May also be taken as a capsule or extract. Found in cosmetic preparations.

Wild Indigo Root

Baptisia tinctoria

COMMON NAME

Standardized: wild indigo
Other: false indigo

BOTANICAL NAME

Baptisia tinctoria (L.) R. Br.
Plant Family: Fabaceae

OVERVIEW

A perennial member of the pea (Fabaceae) family, wild indigo favors dry, poor soil in open areas, and is common throughout the northeastern United States as far south as Florida and west as Minnesota. 

PARTS USED

The roots. An inferior blue dye can be extracted from the flowers and seed pods through a complicated process involving chemicals and fermentation.

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Most often used as a decoction (a half teaspoon in a cup of water up to three times daily), or a tincture (1-2 ml three times daily).

Kola Nut

Cola nitida

COMMON NAME

Standardized: cola
Other: ghanja cola, kola

BOTANICAL NAME

Cola nitida (Vent.) A. Chev.
Plant Family: Sterculiaceae

OVERVIEW

Tropical Africa is the native home of the towering kola tree growing up to 40 feet (13 meters) tall. Its yellow flowers tinged with purple bear reddish-brown seeds about the size of a walnut with almost no taste but rich in caffeine. The Igbo, a tribe in southern Nigeria, consider the kola nut tree to be the first tree (and fruit) on earth. They consider the nut to be a symbol of hospitality, kindness and fraternity. Throughout Western Africa, a small piece of nut is chewed before each meal to promote digestion. It was introduced to Europe in the mid 16th century by Portuguese traders. The nut is also thought to improve the flavour of any food and to counteract the effects of drinking tainted water.

PARTS USED

The whole nut. The nuts, either whole or cut retain their caffeine content better than kola nut powder and it is recommended that you grind your Kola immediately before using.

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Kola, as its name suggests, is the main ingredient in many traditional colas. In herbal medicine, the nut is usually soaked in alcohol to make tinctures. May be taken as tea although bitter, and the powder can be taken as a capsule.

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