Our Products

 

Agrimony

COMMON NAME

Standardized: agrimony
Other: church steeples

BOTANICAL NAME

Agrimonia eupatoria L.
Plant Family: Rosaceae

OVERVIEW

Agrimony is an herb in the rose family found near hedges and fences throughout England. Bearing yellow flowers with egg-shaped petals on spikes emanating from hairy stems, agrimony exudes a distinctive, pleasant scent that is often compared to apricots but isn’t as sweet. During the Elizabethan period herbalists began referring to the plant as philanthropos, perhaps because of its beneficial properties, or perhaps because its seeds stick to the clothing of passers by, giving them the “gift” of next year’s plants.

PRECAUTIONS

Standard: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Acacia (Gum Arabic) Powder

Acacia Senegal

COMMON NAME

Standardized: gum arabic tree Other: acacia, thorny acacia

BOTANICAL NAME

Acacia senegal (L.) Willd.
Plant Family: Fabaceae

OVERVIEW

The acacia trees of the Darfur region of Sudan are harvested for resins variously known as gum arabic, Indian gum arabic, or talha. Although acacia trees are found throughout the ‘gum belt’ of sub-Saharan Africa, Chad, Eritrea, Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, and Sudan, the plant is most abundant in Sudan.

The acacia is a plant in the family Mimosacaea, related to the mimosas of the southern United States and a close cousin of the legumes. It would not be inaccurate to think of the acacia as a tree-sized, woody, spiny bean.

The plant only produces acacia gum under adverse conditions, such as poor soil, drought, or heat, and damaged trees produce more gum. For these reasons, the most abundant harvest of acacia gum is produced in Sudan.

In the Southwestern United States a potentially toxic plant (a species of Acacia) known locally as una de gato (cat’s claw) is frequently confused with the medicinal plant una de gato from the Peruvian Amazon (Uncaria tomentosa). It is not the rainforest herb, and it is not a source of acacia gum, although it is sometimes sold in hierberas as either or both.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Cardamom Pods

Elettaria cardamomum

COMMON NAME

Standardized: cardamom
Other: Mysore cardamom, ela

BOTANICAL NAME

Elettaria cardamomum (L.) Maton var. cardamomum
Plant Family: Zingiberaceae

SYNONYMS

Amomum cardamomumElettaria cardamomum var. minisculaElettaria cardamomum var. minus

OVERVIEW

The sweetly aromatic cardamom is the fruit of a tropical plant related to ginger, and is one of the world's most expensive spices, after saffron and vanilla. Growing cardamom is extremely labor intensive. The tall plants, grown on plantations in Guatemala or India, flower for eight or nine months of the year. Each pod, or capsule, ripens slowly, and must be plucked when it is three-quarters ripe.

PARTS USED

The seed, removed from the pod, and ground.

Whole pods may be used as well.

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Usually in cooking, but also in teas, tinctures, and infusions.

Chive Rings

Allium schoenoprasum

COMMON NAME

Standardized: chive
Other: chives

BOTANICAL NAME

Allium schoenoprasum L.
Plant Family: Liliaceae

OVERVIEW

The chive is the smallest of the onion family and is native to Asia and Europe, and has been used both medicinally and as a culinary ingredient for 5000 years, but not actively cultivated until the middle ages.

PARTS USED

The fresh or dried stem, chopped.

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Can be used to make teas, but more often used in cooking.

     

Coriander Seed

Coriandrum sativum

COMMON NAME

Standardized: coriander (fruit), cilantro (leaf)
Other: Chinese parsley, yuan sui zi

BOTANICAL NAME

Coriandrum sativum L.
Plant Family: Apiaceae

OVERVIEW

Coriander is a spice that has been used in the Mediterranean and Asia for thousands of years and is now widely cultivated and available in the West. Traditionally, it was used to support healthy digestion and was often added to beans or other hard to digest dishes due to its carminative qualities. Further, it is well known as a flavoring for liquor, beers, and various soups, sauces, and meats.

USES AND PREPARATIONS

Dried, ripe spherical fruit (seed) whole or powdered as a spice, tea, or flavoring for liquor.
Fresh ripe fruit distilled into an essential oil

Alfalfa Leaf

Medicago sativa

COMMON NAME

Standardized: alfalfa
Other: lucerne

BOTANICAL NAME

Medicago sativa L.
Plant Family: Fabaceae

OVERVIEW

Well known as a feed plant for livestock, alfalfa has a rich tradition of other uses. In traditional American folk medicine, it has been administered as a nutritive tonic. The dried alfalfa leaf is widely available in herbal shops and health food stores as an herbal tea, tablet, or powder. The seed is often sprouted and eaten in salads and sandwiches.

USES AND PREPARATIONS

The dried leaf or powder can be used in teas, made into capsules or herbal tablets, or infused as an herbal tincture.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Alfalfa Powder

Medicago sativa

COMMON NAME

Standardized: alfalfa
Other: lucerne

BOTANICAL NAME

Medicago sativa L.
Plant Family: Fabaceae

OVERVIEW

Well known as a feed plant for livestock, alfalfa has a rich tradition of other uses. In traditional American folk medicine, it has been administered as a nutritive tonic. The dried alfalfa leaf is widely available in herbal shops and health food stores as an herbal tea, tablet, or powder. The seed is often sprouted and eaten in salads and sandwiches.

BOTANY

Alfalfa is a long-lived perennial in the Fabaceae family with leguminous flowers which vary in color from purple to yellow, trifoliate clover-like leaves, and a deep tap root. Some sources say that taproots have been found reaching down 68 feet into the soil! Alfalfa is native to southwest Asia with wild species occurring in the Caucasus, and in mountainous regions of Afghanistan and Iran, and is very widely cultivated throughout the world.

USES AND PREPARATIONS

The dried leaf or powder can be used in teas, made into capsules or herbal tablets, or infused as an herbal tincture.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Alfalfa Sprouting Seed

Medicago sativa

COMMON NAME

Standardized: alfalfa
Other: lucerne

BOTANICAL NAME

Medicago sativa L.
Plant Family: Fabaceae

OVERVIEW

Alfalfa is one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world, not only for livestock, but also for human consumption. It is an herbaceous legume that is grown in almost every state in the US, but thought to have originated in what is now Iran. It can survive extreme temperatures and conditions. It will become dormant, like in times of extreme drought, and then resume growth when conditions improve.

SUMMARY

These days, alfalfa sprouts are incredibly common on all salad bars and in grocery stores.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Alkanet Root

Alkanna tinctoria

COMMON NAME

Standardized: alkanet

BOTANICAL NAME

Alkanna tinctoria (L.)
Plant Family: Boraginaceae

 

 

SUMMARY

Alkanet root is primarily used as a natural dyeing agent, and it imparts a ruby red color to natural fibers, wool, wood, stone, ointments, salve, lotion, and to tint oils, tinctures, or varnishes. In the past, Alkanet root was used to improve the appearance of low quality wines and ports, and to give an aged appearance to wine corks. However, Alkanet root is now mainly used as a dyeing agent, and is not recommended for internal use.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: Not for internal use. Do not apply to broken or abraded skin. Do not use when nursing.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Alkanet Root Powder

Alkanna tinctoria

COMMON NAME

Standardized: alkanet

BOTANICAL NAME

Alkanna tinctoria (L.)
Plant Family: Boraginaceae

 

 

SUMMARY

Alkanet root is primarily used as a natural dyeing agent, and it imparts a ruby red color to natural fibers, wool, wood, stone, ointments, salve, lotion, and to tint oils, tinctures, or varnishes. In the past, Alkanet root was used to improve the appearance of low quality wines and ports, and to give an aged appearance to wine corks. However, Alkanet root is now mainly used as a dyeing agent, and is not recommended for internal use.

PRECAUTIONS

Specific: Not for internal use. Do not apply to broken or abraded skin. Do not use when nursing.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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